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Satire

Dr. Robert Morey  | November 6, 2007

Jewish and Christian Apologists have always used satire in the defense of the faith and the ridicule of unbelief. The satire of Elijah on Mt. Carmel was as brilliant as it was brutal (1 Kings 18:27). Jesus and Paul did not lack in the use of satire (Gal. 5:12). John Bunyan and many great Christian writers and preachers used satire as a sword to cut to the heart of unbelief. Did they offend people and hurt their feelings? You bet they did! Did they care? NO! In Matt. 15:12-14 we read,

Then the disciples came and said to Him,
“Do You know that the Pharisees were offended
when they heard this statement?”
But He answered and said,
“Every plant that My heavenly Father did not plant shall be rooted up”.
“Ignore them.”
“They are blind guides of the blind.”
“And if a blind man guides a blind man, both will fall into a pit.”

Jesus had just ridiculed them and called them “hypocrites” for robbing their parents in the name of God (vs. 1-18). Did the Pharisees “feel hurt” when Jesus publicly called them names and described them as thieves? Yes. Did Jesus run over to them, get down on his knees, and beg their forgiveness for hurting their feelings? No. But that is what modern evanjellyfish Christianity would tell him to do.

Just before Walter Martin died, he had been scheduled to speak at a conference on apologetics in Rockford, Illinois. The conference organizers asked me to take his place and give a main lecture on “The Cost of Discernment.” Here is the recording.

Length of audio: 43:10

In that message, I demonstrated from Scripture that “being sensitive” and doing your best to avoid “hurting people’s feelings” are vices, not virtues. If getting people mad, making them cry, and hurting their feelings were sins, then hell is the greatest sin God commits! God does not give a rip about your feelings. He wants you to be holy, not happy.

Walter had been condemned as mean, rude, and offensive by the lampooned cultists and occultists. He was my friend for 27 years and, believe me, he used satire a lot. It was part of his appeal to those who had not bowed the knee before the idol of sensitivity training. Those of you who love apologetics now understand why you are accused of “poor taste,” “meanness,” etc. Spineless evanjellyfish are everywhere condemning us left and right for following the example of the prophets, the apostles and Jesus Himself.

I spoke at Biola University on Islam and young girl came up all upset because I said that Muhammad was stupid as well as evil. I used the comic book, Muhammad’s Believe it or Else, as a satire of a nut case who got an army to do his bidding. She had tears in her eyes and demanded to know if the feelings of any Muslims were hurt when I called their prophet stupid. I asked her to email me, as there was no time at the lecture to open the Bible with her. 
We began to correspond and, in the end, she agreed that the prophets, the apostles, Jesus, and God the Father ridiculed and mocked people and called them names such as “stupid” (ex. Jer. 10:8-21). She replied: “BUT WE SHOULD NOT FOLLOW THEIR EXAMPLE BUT BE NICE!” Such ignorance! Such stupidity is only rebellion covered up in the name of being nice.

You will never be effective as an apologist until you learn not to be man-pleasers but God-pleasers. Fear the frown of God more than the frown of man. The smile of God should mean more to you than the smile of man.

“Wickedpeedia,” the highly unreliable and liberal-biased online encyclopedia, usually doesn’t get things right. But because anyone can submit an entry, and because they can’t censor everyone, sometimes a good article appears that is right on the money. The entry on satire is an example of a good article.

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